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What if a Super Bowl broadcaster gets sick? How to do an NBA in-season tourney? Sports Media Mailbag, Part 2 – The Athletic

What if a Super Bowl broadcaster gets sick? How to do an NBA in-season tourney? Sports Media Mailbag, Part 2 – The Athletic
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Welcome to the 30th Athlete’s Mailbag. Writing a mailbag – self-centered – is always a fun exercise. Thank you for submitting your questions via the website and app. There were over 200 questions, so this was a two-part one. The first part appeared on Monday.

(Note: Questions have been edited for clarity and length.)

Do networks maintain contingency plans for major events (think World Championships, Super Bowl, NBA/NHL Finals, etc.) and if so, what are they? If Jim Nantz has a family emergency in the first quarter, is there an on-site alternative? If Mike Breen suddenly lost his voice, what would happen? – Victor F.

It’s a great question, and I don’t think you’re alone in asking. Based on previous reports, networks running major events like the ones above have a theater announcer on standby somewhere in the building in case of an emergency. For example, Ian Eagle was the backup last year for CBS’s Super Bowl coverage in case something happened to Nantz. There are events like the Olympics where the cast on the air is big enough that someone can transform into the position. This is what happened to NBC when Bob Costas developed conjunctivitis in both eyes at the Sochi Games in 2014. I reached out to Brin to ask specifically about your example.

“They were going to take ESPN’s theatrical radio announcer, Mark Kischer, who is excellent, to TV and get another radio job,” Brin said. “It almost happened in the NBA Finals last year in Phoenix. I was on contact tracing and had to test before the games.

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